Thursday, April 13, 2017

Too Many Options - My review of The Benedict Option


I really wanted this book to be good.

It was a mishmash.

I got bogged down in this book like the American government in a Middle Eastern Nation.
Maybe I expected too much. You say "Benedict Option" and I expected a coherent plan to build a community based on the Rule of St. Benedict, a disciplined rule based society that would keep the flame of Western Civilization going. Instead, I got a build it yourself lego system that seemed to defer to the idea of "whatever trips your trigger" ecumenicalism. I honestly, had no idea after reading this book, what the author actually thought his communities should look like.
I will admit, it did make me rethink the initial idea I had in my head going on for this idea.

It would never work.

Monastic life was not some lone outpost of civilization that by itself kept Christianity and Western Civilization alive and kicking. Monasteries were part of the culture. The culture was Christian and included the feudal lords protection and support. There were many factors that aided the monasteries.
If we want a solution to build communities that will outlast the coming craziness, We need to resurrect old ideas for sure, but a Benedictine Rule Community can only be part of the solution. You need things that people will recoil from today because feminism, liberalism and even conservatism have poisoned the well of thought. I saw the author pull back often on the brink of these ideas. You need patriarchy, hierarchy and discipline. American individualism would recoil at most of these also. I myself think individualism is highly overrated.

So, here are the good points and bad points.

Good:
1. High emphasis on tradition, Western civilization and liturgy. I myself have been thinking a lot on liturgy lately and the lack of it in Baptist churches and their abandonment of Tradition. I am a Baptist, by the way.

2. Lot of good ideas in the book with which to build.

Bad:
1. Base idea of Benedict Option being needed due to increasing hostility to Christianity. Benedictines developed not in an air of Christian persecution, but one of a culture based in Christianity. The entire culture was supportive of monasteries. A secret church attitude, like in China, would be the more likely scenario for Christian persecution. Big visible communities would be targeted in this cultural attitude. I myself, think the persecution thing is possible, but it could be that balkanization of US creates regions of greater support of Christianity.

2. Like the title of the review suggests, too many options. I would prefer a system thrown out there that people can critique and think about.

3. The author loves Western Civilization, but pulls back from actually admitting to his own mind that this option is an overwhelmingly "white" option. It comes from Western Civilization and appeals to those who created it. I actually know plenty of black people and if I mentioned this too them they would look at me like I had a horn growing out of the middle of my head. Not all, but most would. We need to start admitting to ourselves that there are vast divides even between Western Christianity and African-American Christianity. The reason I do not go to a black church is because the experience would be foreign to me, just as they find our churches foreign. It is what it is. We have Christ in common and we need to rejoice in that, but the idea that diversity would work in a Benedict Option community is ignoring all the evidence to the contrary. People naturally segregate themselves. It is what it is.

4. This Benedict Option would never work because of too much diversity of Christian thought. Baptists, Episcopals, Methodists and so forth are never going to come together on any ideas to form a community together. It would soon split just like churches do. There are cultural differences even among white Americans that render them foreign to each other also. I lived in South Dakota for a while, I liked the people, but they acted differently than people I grew up with in the South. I am reading another book right now that explains the cultural differences in American regions more thoroughly. What works for South Dakota, with a larger Lutheran presence, wouldn't work in Mississippi. I would say, that maybe the author was thinking along the lines of "different types of communities for different places" was the goal, except for the fact that he fawns over mixed denomination communities too often.


Monday, December 26, 2016

List of books read in 2016



January
1.  Ark Royal by Christopher Nuttal
2.  The Nelson Touch: Ark Royal II by Christopher Nuttal
3.  The Trafalgar Gambit: Ark Royal III by Christopher Nuttal
4.  There Will be War: Volume X edited by Jerry Pournelle
5.  The Handbook of Traditional Living by Raido
6.  The Time Ships by Steven Baxter
7.  Adventures of a Trail Stooge by Chris Quinn
8.  The Saga Hoard: Icelandic Sagas Vol. I
9.  Black Wings of Cthulhu 2 edited by S. T. Joshi
10. Myths and Legends of the Middle Ages by H. A. Guerber
11. Miller's Park by Rob Murphy
12. Warspite: Ark Royal IV by Christopher Nuttal
13. The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
14. Swarm Troopers: How Small Drones Will Conquer the World by David Hambling
15. The Hour of the Dragon by Robert E. Howard Gutenberg link free!
16. No Man's Land by Jack Donovan Free ebook on author's website!

February

17. A Savage War of Peace: Ark Royal V by Christopher Nuttal
18. A Small Colonial War: Ark Royal VI by Christopher Nuttal
19. Queen of the Black Coast by Robert E. Howard Gutenberg link free!
20. Charlemagne: King of the Franks by Cameron White
21. Three Fantastic Surprises by Sarah A. Hoyt Free!
22. The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli
23. The Elder Ice: A Harry Stubbs Adventure by David Hambling
24. Storm Front: Twilight of the Gods by Christopher G. Nuttal
25. CTRL ALT Revolt! by Nick Cole

March
26. A Mountain Walked: Great Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos edited by S.T. Joshi
27. Old Ironsides by Dean Crawford
28. Agricola by Tacitus
29. The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling
30. The World at the End of Time by Frederik Pohl
31. The Travels by Marco Polo
32. Southerner, Take Your Stand by John Vinson

April
33. Vanguard by Christopher G. Nuttal
34. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
35. The Fold by Peter Clines
36. Dune by Frank Herbert
37. Ultima by Stephen Baxter
38. Building Your Book for Kindle Free
39. Publish on Amazon Kindle with Kindle Direct Publishing Free

May
40. Mysteries of the South by Charles Rivers Editors
41. Mutiny in Space by Rod Walker
42. An Authenticated History of the Famous Bell Witch by M.V. Ingram
43. Becoming a Barbarian by Jack Donovan
44. A Plunder of Souls (The Thieftaker Chronicles Book 3) by D.B. Jackson

June
45. The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson and Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur Free!
46. The Collected Short Stories of Louis L'Amour, Volume 1: Frontier Stories
47. Spearhavoc & other short tales: Alternative Histories:1066 by C.R. May Free!

July
48. The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi
49. Revolt in 2100 by Robert Heinlein
50. The Ranger by Ace Atkins
51. A Long Time Until Now by Michael Z. Williamson
52. Dark Victory by William Shatner
53. My Sixty Years on the Plains by W. T. Hamilton

August
54. Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer
55. Echoes of Earth by Sean Williams and Shane Dix
56. The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
57. The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
58. A Throne of Bones (Arts of Dark and Light Book 1) by Vox Day

September
59. Brings the Lightning (The Ames Archives Book 1) by Peter Grant
60. The Queen's Poisoner (The Kingfountain Series Book 1) by Jeff Wheeler
61. The Thief's Daughter (The Kingfountain Series Book 2) by Jeff Wheeler

October
62. Fistfights With Muslims In Europe: One Man's Journey Through Modernity by Julian Langness 
63. The People's Republic by Kurt Schlichter
64. The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives by Plutarch
65. The End of the World as We Knew It by Nick Cole
66. The DIY Blacksmithing Book (Blacksmith Books 1) by Terran Marks 
67. The King's Traitor (The Kingfountain Series Book 3) by Jeff Wheeler
68. The Red King by Nick Cole

November
69. The Dark Knight (Wyrd Book 2) By Nick Cole
70. The Colonial Cavalier or Southern Life before the Revolution by Maud Wilder Goodwin and Harry Stillwell Edwards

December
70. The Pawn in the Portal (Wyrd Book 3) by Nick Cole
71. The Lost Castle (Wyrd Book 4) by Nick Cole
72. Abandon by Blake Crouch
73. Desert Spaces by Blake Crouch
74. Locked Doors by Blake Crouch
75. Rendevous With Rama by Arthur C. Clarke
76. Rama II by Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee


Tuesday, October 4, 2016

An Article on the Tennessee Club: Published December 20, 1876 in the Memphis Daily Appeal


This is article was transcribed and somewhat corrected by me from the OCR interpretation for reproduction on this blog. The original can be found here.
__________________________________________________________________________

The "Tennessee"
_______
The New Club - Opened to Members and 
Their Friends on Monday Night - An
Elegant Interview.
___________
What Clubs were in the Olden Time, and
what they are in the New - Their
Purposes and Advantages
___________

     The Tennessee club was opened on Monday night to members and their city friends, and unless otherwise ordered by the governing committee, will here after remain closed to other than members and out-of-town visitors. There was no ceremony. The doors were thrown open to all comers, the rooms were brilliantly lighted, and all who entered wandered at will from room to room, ejaculation and exclamation telling of the fresh surprise that at every turn waited on the visitor. There was already an aroma of club life pervading the atmosphere, and notwithstanding the newness and freshness of furniture and appointments, guests and clubmen alike fitted to the surroundings, every one rejoicing that at last we had a club on the best plan, the home of which is all that such a home can be made. So pleasantly located the Tennessees cannot fail to quickly recruit beyond any limit they have at present set, and make themselves felt as a potent and powerful influence in the social life of the city.
___________
     Clubs and Club Life - The Tennessees
     In New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, NewOrleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston, Nashville, Louisville, and other cities in America,clubs have become a respectable and representative feature in the social system. In many instances the influence of these clubs have been felt both socially and politically, as organizations embody in their respective memberships much of the learning, culture. and even moneyed power of the prominent and respected circles of society. Did time permit, we could give along and interesting account of the origin of clubs in American cities, their progress, development, influence and advantages, together with much that recalls pleasant reminiscences of their past, and which would naturally and rightly stimulate in any intelligent and thrifty community a desire to have these organizations formed and perfected to a degree of unexceptional sociability and utility. Clubs originated in England -being at first societies or coteries as far back as the days of Sir Walter Raleigh, Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, Capham, Beaumont and Fletcher (the twin stars of the drama), and other wits and literati of the age. On Friday street, London, was located "The Mermaid,' where Raleigh astonished everyone by smoking tobacco, while Ben Johnson founded a club which held it's first meetings
in the old Devil tavern, where Crew, Martin, Donne, Cotton, Selden and others of that age were wont to assemble and have a merry time, both theology and politics being excluded. Under the reign of Charles II the
corrupt excesses of the age had a most powerful influence upon the clubs, which degenerated into vicious and immoral habits and customs. About 1735 the "Beefsteak club" was formed, thanks to the social habits and appreciative habits of the earl of Peterborough, who chanced to visit Rich, the pantomimist, and included among its members Brougham, Fox, Sheridan, and the remarkable duke of Norfolk. These clubs, however,
were organized on a modest scale, and between them and the magnificence of the present London clubs, which occupy among the finest buildings in the British metropolis, there 'was as much difference as
now exists between a country " 'possum supper", and a metropolitan banquet. While the facilities of modern life-club have wonderfully increased the expense has greatly diminished, each member for a small yearly
sum being enabled to secure comforts and advantages which only an ample fortune could procure. Previous to the establishment of clubs in England, tavern and coffeehouses supplied the place of these institutions. According to the account which Calley gives of his first visit to "Will's in Covent Garden, it required an "introduction to that society not to be considered an impertinent intruder. The politicians assembled at the St. James coffee-house, whence all the articles in the first "Tatters" are dated. "White's" was the favorite morning lounge for young dandies and men of fashion about town, in those days three o'clock was the fashionable London dining hour. Soon after six the men began to assemble at the coffeehouses they frequented. The lighter graces of wit, refinement and conviviality were but too often the prelude to hard drinking in
those days. The staid and sober gentlemen who now-a-days frequent the gorgeous modern clubs hi Pall-Mall and St. James street are not in search of "lawless revelry," high play, or those keen passes of wit which
characterized Brooke's in the days of George, Selwyn and Fox." They rather seek the comforts of a home, freedom from restraint, a good cuisine, and fine wines at the lowest possible cost, a well-chosen library, a quiet game of whist, and, above all, the inestimable privilege of not being bored by family, friends, foes, duns or acquaintances. From England clubs have passed to other countries, where they have also become popular, wealthy, and largely representative of the higher and more commanding worth of society. On the continent they take the form of the French "circle" or the German "casino," having assumed real social perfection in Paris, being situated in the most elegant quarters, and fitted up with great luxuriance. At all
French clubs there is a daily table d'hote, for which members inscribe their names and those of their friends whom they wish to invite. In English and American clubs, however, the table d'hote system is rather the ex
ception than the rule. While the English idea of club life has found favor, and made great progress in the
various American cities, in no place has the system become so general or attained such magnificence as in New York. In that city, as at present here and elsewhere, young men who frequent clubs were in the habit of
meeting at hotels, taverns, chop-houses, drinking-saloons and billiard-halls. In New York, and other large cities of America, most of the young men in certain conditions of life belong to some one of the many clubs
which have sprung up in such abundance during the last fifteen or twenty years. "For those who are unmarried," says an intelligent writer, "an organization of this kind is a great boon, almost a home. At a moderate rate they secure furnished rooms in the neighborhood of their club. Here they breakfast and dine. Lunch is taken downtown. The habit, or rather the necessity of taking 'lunch down town' has already made
it's influence manifest in New York." We find in the World, of that city, the following article upon the subject of "luncheon clubs:"
While strife and rumors of strife disturb the atmosphere of club life In the upper regions of the city, there is a movement gathering strength, we are told, to revive a particular variety of club down-town which sprang up, nourished and died out there some fifteen rears ago. This may be called a Luncheon club, the object being to provide the members with a convenient and accessible place where, like General Scott, they may "snatch a hasty plate of soup" in the middle of the day. A number of merchants are said to have already subscribed to the project, which in its main features resembles rather the mercantile casinos or lonjas established for the convenience of foreigners at such ports as Vera Cruz, Callao Valparaiso, than the regular English or American club with which we are all familiar.

It is of the essence of the true English and American club that It belongs to the night-life of great cities as it has been picturesquely said by a clever woman of the olive tree, that it grows by moonlight, so it may be said of the true modern club that it grows by gaslight. It Is a place where the members may meet in their hours of relative relaxation, after dinner, to sum up the events of the day, exchange speculations on the morrow, and generally "shake up" their minds. When the luncheon-club experiment was tried in New York before, it very soon came to grief. The '"truck" of the members, to use an expressive If not an elgant phrase, soon found that the managers were better served than themselves, they began to suspect that they were no better off than that most degraded class of beings known, despoiled and despised of all practical men as "stockholders." As the same causes are apt to produce the same effects all the world over, the luncheon clubs of South America and Asia and other regions, in which it might be supposed the sharper necessity for such an institution would counteract its radical vices, have fared little better. In many instances they have degenerated into mere barrooms, where, during the business hours of the day, a few foreign stragglers can be found imbibing fantastic imitations of English or American drinks, or maundering over old numbers of Punch and the Illustrated News and La Vie Parisienne. With such excellent provision as now exists down town for the inward accommodation of the business community during the busy part of the day, the fate of any revival of the old Luncheon club may be easily predicted from the outset.
     But to return to the advantages of club life to young men who are unmarried and have no family, as set forth by the practical workings of the system in New York. The writer whom we quoted says "When the day's work is over, our young clubite goes to his room, dresses for dinner, and repairs to his club, where all his wants are supplied. For from forty to seventy-five dollars per annum he is furnished the year round with luxurious rooms, gas, fire, daily papers, magazines, books of reference, the use of a library, materials for writing, and admirable attendance. He has the command of regular servants, without having to pay or to manage them. He can have whatever meal or refreshment he wants, served up with comfort and cleanliness, of the best-mounted private establishment. He orders just what hechooses, having no interest to think of but
his own. He can always command agreeable society. In short, it is impossible to suppose a greater degree of liberty in living." In view of the organization of the Tennessee club in this city, it may not be amiss to give a few points relative to the grand clubs in New York city. By far the oldest and most complete of these is the Union club, organized in 1836, its membership being Limited to one thousand, initiation fee $100, and annual
dues $75. Some idea of the wealth and magnitude of the Union club may be had when it is stated that there- are seventy employees attached to its service, the annual pay-roll being $53,000. Among the items of expense for the past year were $8000 for rent, $7000 for fuel, $3000 for stationery and printing, $3000 for
cards, and $1500 for newspapers and periodicals. Large as these items may appear, the receipts of the club for 1876 amounted to $109,000. The lot, building, furniture, wines, liquors, cigars, provisions and stores on hand, cash and dues trom members, are valued at $375,182. This club is largely composed of heads of families, and like other such organizations in New York, receives among its members and officers the gravest, worthiest, and most conservative men in the communitv -men who have distinguished themselves in law, commerce, and politics, and are identified with the great social, industrial, and commercial movement of the day. Another noticeable and prominent organization in the above city is the New York club, organized about 1848, being considered the exponent of the ideas of the jeunessee doree. The New York club opened with about one hundred members, and soon became the foremost organization for the young men of that city. Its membership is limited to four hundred, the initiation fee being two hundred dollars and the yearly dues seventy-five dollars. The New York club is an incorporated organization, having the right of holding real estate to the amount of three hundred thousand dollars. At present it is located in the large house on the southeast corner of Astor Place and Broadway, its annual rent being fifteen thousand dollars. Near the New York club is located the Knickerbocker club, which was organized in December, 1871, its membership, being limited to three hundred; the initiation fee is three hundred dollars, and the yearly dues one hundred dollars. This club is admirably managed, and has a prominent status, Alexander Hamilton, jr., being its president. The oldest artistic and literary club ot New York city is the Century club, which was founded
in 1817. The object of this club was to form an association of gentlemen of the city of New York engaged or interested in literature and the fine arts, with a view to their advancement as well as the promotion of social
intercourse. The Century has in its art gallery about one hundred pictures, engravings, casts and busts, valued at over $26,000, and a library of fifteen hundred volumes. The membership is limited to five hundred, the initiation fee being one hundred dollars and the annual dues thirty-six dollars. It is in a flourishing condition, owning property to the amount of $119,689 53. The Century, Union and German clubs are the only organizations of their kind that occupy buildings especiallv erected for club-house purposes. Similar in object and aim to the Century is the Arcadian club, organized in May, 1872, and paying an annual rent of $6000; the initiation being $50 for professional and $100 for non-professional members. The membership is limited to 600, the annual dues being $40. The main aim of the Arcadian is to promote fellowship among journalists, artists, musicians, literary men and members of the dramatic profession. Art, music, the drama and literature constitute a subject of attention from respective committees, each of which select an evening for their special behoof, and can invite for such evening only an artist, literary man, journalist or dignitary who may desire to be present. Ladies are invited to the monthly receptions, which are usually brilliant. During the gay season
there is a Saturday table d'hote, to which members can invite a friend. Pall Mall, originated some sixty years ago by Lord Cattereagh, has its antitype in the Travelers' club, which is comfortable, homelike and well managed. The object of this club, like its great prototype in Pall Mall, was to afford a resort for gentlemen who had resided or traveled abroad, as well as with a view to the accommodation of foreigners, who, when
properly recommended, received an invitation for the period of their stay. Another New York club of great weight and importance is the Manhattan, which is partly social and partly political, being in close sympathetic communion with the Democratic party. The principal leaders of the Democratic party, both in the city and State of New York, are members of this association, its president being August Belmont. The late John Van Buren had a great deal to do with the establishment of this club, whose membership is limited to six hundred. The initiation fee is $250, and the yearly due, $50, The Union League club formed in May, 1863, is partly social and political in its aims and objects. It is in direct affiliation with the Republican party. Similar in purpose to the Arcadian is the Lotos club, which was founded in March, 1870. Distinguished strangers, sojourning in the city, are always welcome at the Lotos club. The resident membership is limited to four
hundred. In addition to the above oaganizations in New York, we may mention the New York Yacht Club, organized July 30, 1844; the American Jockey club, and the Army and Navy club, organized in April, 1871, These three clubs have also their social features, and in point of wealth and
prominence are of no little representation in the New Y'ork club system. We have thus presented as it were a glimpse into the character of the leading clubs of New York city, for from the character of the gentlemen who are members of the Tennessee club we feel assured that our city will be proud of the organization and the good results of its operations.
THE TENNESSEE CLUB
received its charter about two years ago, the incorporators being Colton Greene, D. P. Hadden, H. C. Warriner. C. W. Metcalf, U.B. Miller, and I. M. Hill. Pursuant to the powers vested by the charter the incorpora tors effected a temporary organization by selecting as the executive committee, General Colton Greene, chairman, J. M. Fowlkes, R.B. Clark and R. D. Snowden. The regular organization will be effected at the meeting Thursday night, when the regular officers will be elected and the governing committee
appointed. The Tennessee club is oganized on the stock plan, each share being placed at $10. The amount of initiation and the regular dues have not been announced, though the membership is already, about two hundred. The governing committee will have the arrangement of the dues and the management of the club, which is inaugurated under the most favorable auspices. Since the temporary organization of which we speak was made,the executive committee, above named, has rented the three upperstories of the large
and commodious budding, No. 37 South Court street, and so altered and fitted it up as to make it suitable in every respect for the purposes of a club-house. The building is four stories high, and occupies a most desirable locality, having all the retiracy, and at the same time being adjacent to the center of the city. It is midway between Main and Second streets, its front overlooking Court square, with its green sward, glistening fountain, and wealth of magnolia, oak and other trees, where the partially-tamed squirrels sport and frisk about to the great delight and amusement of visitors and others who frequent the beautiful park. A description of the
TENNESSEE CLUB-HOUSE
cannot be made within a short space. Upon entering the door, which is opened in response to an electric annunciator, the visitor ascends a handsomely-mounted staiwayto the first floor, where elegance, taste and convenience are at once manifested by the arrangement of the hall, handsome walnut doors with French
plate-glass, and handsome chandeliers, and modestly beautiful carpet. To the left, and immediately at the head of the stairway which reaches the hall, is the office, which will be occupied by the secretary, who will be
a member of the club. This office is of rich walnut, neatly paneled and ingrained. the upper part being surmounted by a framework of ground glass. the east wall holds a ruby window, of octagonal shape, the glass being of the same material as that which encompasses the office. Immediately in rear of the office is the boudoir, fitted up in the most approved style. To the left of the center hall is the library, a room whose furniture, papering and carpet at once attract the eye and ellicit the admiration. The furniture in this room is of walnut, with table to match. The papering and paneling are in accord with the color of the carpet and furniture. A noticable feature is an elegant chandelier, with patent drop-light. On the opposite side of this hall is the parlor, a large and commodious room, fitted up in handsome style. The walls are decorated with the very finest paper and paneling, while the furniture is elegant and novel. The furniture is of walnut, the cushioning being of Egyptian fabric, made of feathers and silk. Every glance gives a clear and harmonious combination of right and obtuse angles, the colors of the carpet blendinig in harmony with
those of the cushions. At either end of the room is a handsome mirror, set in rich walnut to correspond with the windows and doors, the glass of which is heavy French plate. This will be the general lounge-room
for social intercourse and such diversions as the members desire. In the library there will always be found the daily papers of the Union, four London dailies, besides one daily of Manchester and Liverpool, England, and
Dublin. Ireland, all the American magazines, the leading English magazines, and French magazines. This will be the neucleus for a grand and permanent library. On the next floor is located the billiard hall and a number
of card rooms. The billiard hall contains four handsome tables and outfit, with the usual compliment of chairs for spectators. This hall, like the card rooms, parlor and library, is also fitted up in the very best style. Everything indicates the good taste of the committee in the selection of the furniture, and the artistic talent of Mr. E. C. Jones, the architect, under whose direction and design
the building was altered and the improvements made. On the fourth floor is a large hall and two committee rooms. These apartments have not yet been finished, but their outfit and furniture will be equally as appropriate and handsome as those already mentioned, in fact; we can no where in the south find club rooms more, elegantly fitted and more beautifully furnished than those of the Tennessee club. The monogram of
this club is seen in the furniture, window curtains and service. Every arrangement, from the wine cellar to the root, is in accord with convenience, elegance and comfort. The general design of the whole house was conceived by the executive committee, with Mr. E. G. Jones, who made the plans the change necessary to render the building what it now is. The elegant walnut furniture in different mountings was made on special contract by Mitchell, Hoffman & Co., of this city, who also fitted up the entire building in the luxurious style of which we speak. The handsome walnut cornices, window casings, doors, etc., were made by W. II. Eader & Co., of this city, under the directions of Mr. E. C. Jones, the architect. The handsome wall
papering, window shades and decorations were done in the most skillful manner by Marcus Jones, while the painting is the most artistic ellort yet made by Hook & LaGrill. In every room and hall there is an electric enunciator and indicator for summoning servants and waiters and announcing the arrival of members. This leature is the work of A. O. Schultz. The chandeliers and furniture, which harmonize so well, and are the
wonder as well as the admiration of every beholder, were made by Mitchell, Vance & Co., of New York, especially for the Tennessee club. In addition to the rooms which we have mentioned, there are the necessary washrooms and private apartments. To avoid all odors from the kitchen, no such feature is within the building. However, a connecting hallway leads to Gaston's neighboring restaurant where any and everything can be ordered by the electric bell, and will be served in the most elegant style known to the cuisine. Nothing but the purest and most reliable brands of wines, liquors and cigars will be kept in the club.
     While card playing, chess, smoking and other social diversions are allowable, no species of gambling will be tolerated. In fact gambling is not only excluded, but any kind of gaming will result in the expulsion of the member who attempts it. The primary object of the Tennessee club is social intercourse in a genial and gentlemanly manner. That it will accomplish much good we need hardly say. The informal opening of the club house last nigth, the generous spirit that pervaded, and the warm courtesy that marked the occasion, somewhat indicate the social excellence and elegant hospitality that will characterize the career of the Tennessee club. 

Books Read in September 2016

The Man in the Arena


Friday, June 17, 2016

My research so far on WM Parrish for my wife.


So, I have been researching my wife's ancestry.
Starting with my wife's grandfather, Clute McCord Parrish, I started delving in to see how far back I could go.
Clute proved relatively easy to track down as did a lot of information on his father, George Daniel Parrish.

George Daniel Parrish was born in 1860. I was able to deduce this from census records where he and Clute were both listed. I am pretty sure this is where he is buried. Both my wife's great grandparent's and great-grandparent's on the Wingard side are also buried there. The Parrish family has very distinct connections through the census records to Autauga County and later Elmore County (which was once part of Autauga). and the area around Lightwood, Deatsville and New Hope Church.

It is trying to find the father and mother of George Daniel that is proving difficult as there are records that show different names for the wife.
It is probably a W M Parrish and possibly W may be Wesley.

I will show what I have found so far.

The census record from 1880 Elmore, New Hope, lists a G. Danil Parrish (b. 1860) as living in the household of Mary Fuller (b. 1834) with several other Parrishes: Thomas Parrish (b. 1859), Sidney Parrish (b. 1862) and also Willie Johnson (b. 1875 and not related) Everyone here born in Alabama.
I think Mary Fuller is probably the widow of WM Parrish.
Living nearby is first this household William Parrish (b. 1820, GA), Louisa (wife), Edward (son), Della (daughter) and Julias (son).
Second household, Jessee Parrish (b. 1829, GA), Budey (wife), James (son), Eubulus (son), William (son), Jessee (son) and Sarah (daughter)
The heads may be important later as they may be the brothers of WM since one record shows him being born in Georgia.

The 1860 Census for Robinson Springs, Autauga County shows: WM Parrish (b. 1828, GA) overseer, Mary (b. 1836, AL) wife, Janes (b. 1858), George (b. 1860).
The wife would appear to match name wise, but not age wise and Janes, while the birth date could be different due to when the census was taken, is no the same name as Thomas. Could still be the same though just using a middle name.
No other Parrishes appear to live nearby.
Robinson Springs is also farther away from the epicenter of most of the Parrish residences. as seen below. But no place is farther than 15 miles from each other.


I have Alabama Civil War Service Records of Confederate Soldiers that shows a WM Parrish serving with Hilliard's Legion. Hilliard's Legion served at Chickamauga where this WM Parrish was killed.
Parrish W.M. Co.E. 2nd Bat. Hilliard's legion entered March 16,1862 died May 3, 1863 Nara report states coffin and grave
Found these on the Alabama Civil War Service Database. WM Parrish and this both Autauga County. The 4 dependents would match up with the 1880 Census. Not sure on this though.
Interestingly, the NPS database has an alternate name for him Henry M./Parish
If this is my wife's ancestor, then this would be cool for her. She would like to go to the battlefield and I could figure out where his company fought and probably show her the general area where he died. Tactile history is the best history.

We also have, a Marriage event for Wesley M. Parrish to Polly Norris on 02 Apr 1858 in Autauga County. This name is completely different than Mary. Also one that shows the event date as 29 Apr 1858.
But this links back into Sidney from the 1880 census. I found a record of him in Alabama Deaths: 1908-1974. They list his father as Wesley Parrish and mother as Polly Norris. Is it possible that Polly an Mary are the same person? I am starting to think so.

I need to do a bit more research on the Polly/Mary thing and also the possible brothers of Wesley.


Miscellaneous mentions:
Genealogy.com question - Mentions Polly, Thomas, George and Sidney.
Autaugans in the Civil War

Unpopular Thoughts on a Friday Morning - 6/17/16


1. You know, I am a Southerner but up to a year or so ago I didn't care one way or the other about the Confederate battle flag (CBF). I was neither pro nor con. I know plenty of people that fly the flag, have stickers or tattoos of it. They do not hate black people nor dream of a return to slavery. They are no more prejudiced than any normal person is in the course of their day. I have never seen anyone use it in a fashion designed to deliberately hurt anyone.
They are merely proud of their heritage and their ancestors. If we have no sense of our past then what kind of future can we have so disconnected.
The past year has seen attacks on the heritage of Southern whites. Not just on the CBF, but also on monuments. This is part of a longer term attack on Southern culture that has been ongoing since the end of the Civil War.
I slowly started on the path to support of the CBF. None of these people I know are trying to hurt anyone and they are being slandered continuously for nothing. Why because someone's feels are hurt?
Sorry, but feels is a very dumb reason for me.
Then this past week, the Southern Baptist Convention decided to repudiate the CBF and called on their members to discontinue use.
Firstly, no SBC church I have ever seen flies a CBF. I don't believe any do. So, this was mainly the SBC trying to control members. Add to that this approval of the use of "Great Commission Baptists" as an alternative name, and it appears to me that the "Southern" Baptist Convention has become embarrassed by the majority of their members.
This is adoption of Northern thought that always wishes to downgrade Southerners. They make fun of our speech. They make fun of our culture. They make fun of our religion. Well, now our religion has joined them in being embarrassed by us. They have joined the culture at large and decided we are racist and must be corrected for our own good. How very authoritarian of them.

2. I think this is the SBC getting ready for a push to rid Mississippi of it's flag. I think they think they are being proactive and getting ahead of the cultural curve. If this is their goal, I foresee a lot of Mississippi churches dropping out of the SBC and churches being split.
All for what? So the SBC could virtue signal to the culture at large that they were hip and with it?

3. Thinking about getting a Mississippi state flag sticker to affix to my car.

4. Not only that, the SBC has decided to push for more Muslim refugees in the US. This is ill thought out and probably a push by Russell Moore who pushes for a lot of what we see in the paragraphs above. Probably, from his hatred of Trump that is so evident.
We are called to go to the nations, not bring them here.
We have no magic dirt that will magically turn them into citizens and Christians. Evidence what happened this week in Orlando, a 2nd generation Muslim who still didn't think of himself as American. They don't assimilate and their religion calls for Hijrah, conquering by migrating into our lands. The SBC is setting itself up to be looked as aiding these goals. It is all well and good to care for people, but you can do that without destroying the security of your own people. It is called go to them. Trump is the only one calling for a common sense start to a solution to this problem.
And don't tell me how we can screen them, third world hellholes at war keep little if any records and they want to get rid of these problem children. We ourselves are unable to effectively screen or even track people we let in. Also, we have DHS people on terror watch lists for God's sake.
Diversity+proximity=WAR. We don't need to pass down this problem to our children.

5. All they had to do was leave shit alone, but typical SJW herd mentality propels them to head for the cliffs and over. There was no pressing need for this flag thing.


Thursday, June 2, 2016

Unpopular thoughts on a Thursday afternoon - 6/2/16


1. Build the wall. Send them home. People who think otherwise are short sighted. They think everything will turn out rosy in the end, but history says otherwise. Diversity+Proximity=War. It may be a decades down the road, but it always ends the same. If we don't have the guts to do it now then we doom our children to it. This includes all illegals immigrants and Muslims legal or illegal who don't yet have citizenship. The Muslims are the most direct threat. But, black people also know the wonders of diversity at the hands of the hispanic community. We have enough problems with those we have here now. We don't need to allow needless problems. Everyone that came here has someplace they come from that has a whole lot of people just like them. They will feel at home. Don't be the person who pawns the problem off on your kids.

2. Christians are the worst for thinking that somehow they will make heaven here on earth through their works. Nope, it all goes like crap until the end. The only time it gets better is at the Second Coming.

3. People who freak out that Trump will become a dictator are the worst. They have no context on which to base this thought, just fears. These fears have been ground into them by the pundit class who have decided to run one of their own as a Presidential candidate. They don't think to highly of themselves, do they? Maybe like AsianConservativeMan on twitter says: Stop whining about "the establishment." No such thing! Now go support the National Review writer chosen by the Weekly Standard editor. Scott Adams has been right about Trump so far so I choose to believe him over those idiot pundits who were wrong the whole time. Here he talks about the risks of a Trump Presidency.

4. Glenn Reynold's hits the nail on the head here:
When politeness and orderliness are met with contempt and betrayal, do not be surprised if the response is something less polite, and less orderly. Brooks closes his Trump column with Psalm 73, but a more appropriate verse is Hosea 8:7 "For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind.” Trump’s ascendance is a symptom of a colossal failure among America’s political leaders, of which Brooks’ mean-spirited insularity is only a tiny part. God help us all.
5.  Speaking of David French and the Renegade Party, they oppose America being great again. You would think a party created by professional writers would read that before tweeting it. It is an ad for Trump. Also, what is up with him thinking that "white working class communities need to die." Has Kristol lost it and being serious or is he trolling us all with David French.

6. Lot of people saying that because David French is an Iraq War Veteran with a Bronze Star that nothing can be said of him. Bullshit! All props to his service, but as a veteran myself, I reserve the right to criticize. First, bronze stars are not always given out for heroism, this may be a shock to civilians, but some are just given out for meritorious service. Unless it has a "V" device for valor, I remain unimpressed. The fact that he was JAG leads me to believe it was probably for meritorious service.

7.  A $4,500,000 handgun...swett goonie goo goo. It is awesome that it is made out of meteorite though.

8. So, Glenn Beck is suspended from XM radio for comments made by his guest, Brad Thor. Thor is a writer, who talked about some patriot assassinating Trump if he became a dictator. He defends his comments by saying it was all hypothetical and taken out of context based on if he became a dictator. Sounds reasonable, right? Except that Thor has for months been on the Glenn Beck looney train and if you follow him on twitter, you know he really thinks Trump will become a dictator. That really puts the context in his words. I quit following him about a month ago, because he seemed to be becoming unbalanced. That is what happens when you hang out with Glenn Beck I guess. Beck isn't known for hi sanity. Lately he has been known for his false prophecies that Cruz would be elected President and save the Constitution by fulfilling the White Horse Prophecy of Mormonism. That bring me full circle, Trump dictator theorists are the worst.

Books Read in 2016 (as of June 2)


January
1.  Ark Royal by Christopher Nuttal
2.  The Nelson Touch: Ark Royal II by Christopher Nuttal
3.  The Trafalgar Gambit: Ark Royal III by Christopher Nuttal
4.  There Will be War: Volume X edited by Jerry Pournelle
5.  The Handbook of Traditional Living by Raido
6.  The Time Ships by Steven Baxter
7.  Adventures of a Trail Stooge by Chris Quinn
8.  The Saga Hoard: Icelandic Sagas Vol. I
9.  Black Wings of Cthulhu 2 edited by S. T. Joshi
10. Myths and Legends of the Middle Ages by H. A. Guerber
11. Miller's Park by Rob Murphy
12. Warspite: Ark Royal IV by Christopher Nuttal
13. The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
14. Swarm Troopers: How Small Drones Will Conquer the World by David Hambling
15. The Hour of the Dragon by Robert E. Howard Gutenberg link free!
16. No Man's Land by Jack Donovan Free ebook on author's website!

February

17. A Savage War of Peace: Ark Royal V by Christopher Nuttal
18. A Small Colonial War: Ark Royal VI by Christopher Nuttal
19. Queen of the Black Coast by Robert E. Howard Gutenberg link free!
20. Charlemagne: King of the Franks by Cameron White
21. Three Fantastic Surprises by Sarah A. Hoyt Free!
22. The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli
23. The Elder Ice: A Harry Stubbs Adventure by David Hambling
24. Storm Front: Twilight of the Gods by Christopher G. Nuttal
25. CTRL ALT Revolt! by Nick Cole

March
26. A Mountain Walked: Great Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos edited by S.T. Joshi
27. Old Ironsides by Dean Crawford
28. Agricola by Tacitus
29. The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling
30. The World at the End of Time by Frederik Pohl
31. The Travels by Marco Polo
32. Southerner, Take Your Stand by John Vinson

April
33. Vanguard by Christopher G. Nuttal
34. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
35. The Fold by Peter Clines
36. Dune by Frank Herbert
37. Ultima by Stephen Baxter
38. Building Your Book for Kindle Free
39. Publish on Amazon Kindle with Kindle Direct Publishing Free

May
40. Mysteries of the South by Charles Rivers Editors
41. Mutiny in Space by Rod Walker
42. An Authenticated History of the Famous Bell Witch by M.V. Ingram
43. Becoming a Barbarian by Jack Donovan
44. A Plunder of Souls (The Thieftaker Chronicles Book 3) by D.B. Jackson

June
45. The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson and Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur Free!
46. The Collected Short Stories of Louis L'Amour, Volume 1: Frontier Stories
47. Spearhavoc & other short tales: Alternative Histories:1066 by C.R. May Free!

July
48. The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi
49. Revolt in 2100 by Robert Heinlein
50. The Ranger by Ace Atkins
51. A Long Time Until Now by Michael Z. Williamson
52. Dark Victory by William Shatner
53. My Sixty Years on the Plains by W. T. Hamilton

August
54. Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer
55. Echoes of Earth by Sean Williams and Shane Dix
56. The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
57. The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
58. A Throne of Bones (Arts of Dark and Light Book 1) by Vox Day

September
59. Brings the Lightning (The Ames Archives Book 1) by Peter Grant
60. The Queen's Poisoner (The Kingfountain Series Book 1) by Jeff Wheeler
61. The Thief's Daughter (The Kingfountain Series Book 2) by Jeff Wheeler

October
62. Fistfights With Muslims In Europe: One Man's Journey Through Modernity by Julian Langness 
63. The People's Republic by Kurt Schlichter
64. The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives by Plutarch
65. The End of the World as We Knew It by Nick Cole
66. The DIY Blacksmithing Book (Blacksmith Books 1) by Terran Marks 
67. The King's Traitor (The Kingfountain Series Book 3) by Jeff Wheeler
68. The Red King by Nick Cole

November
69. The Dark Knight (Wyrd Book 2) By Nick Cole
70. The Colonial Cavalier or Southern Life before the Revolution by Maud Wilder Goodwin and Harry Stillwell Edwards

December
70.


Saturday, May 28, 2016

Unpopular thoughts on a Saturday Evening - 5/28/16

1. (Posted on FB yesterday) A-bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki saved so many lives in the long run, both American and Japanese. An invasion of the Japanese Islands would have been costly for both nations. Truman made the right choice. We didn't start that war and Obama shouldn't be apologizing for something we didn't start. He should be here honoring our war dead on this Memorial Day weekend. Maybe the Pearl Harbor Memorial would have been more fitting.

2. The Navy has been experimenting with a railgun. First thought was to shrink it and start trials on tanks. Always the 19K thoughts going on in my head. But, maybe keep it the same size and make it orbital would be an idea also.

3. The #NeverTrump people's long multi-part screeds on twitter are so boring. Why do people RT them? At the very least come up with your own impassioned way of calling all us Trump voters boogerheads.

4. What I really love is when they say "We can fight Hillary!" They never fought Obama. Yep, not very credible #NeverTrump crowd. #NeverTrumps record of fighting liberals is one of the reasons they were rejected, but they still refuse to see it.

5. So, if Toyota acquires the terminator like robots of Boston Dynamics should we nuke their headquarters preemptively in case of Skynet? Obama can always apologize again.
Those robot animals are scary things in action. add a set of guns on the sides and claws and they could be badass. Everytime I see them the Terminator theme echoes in my head...bumbum-bumbumbum...bumbum-bumbumbum.

6. My wife went on the internet while the San Diego riots outside of the Trump rally were happening. She was cheering the cops on. But then again, when people attack while wielding foreign flags on American soil, who else should you cheer for? Her final thoughts on the matter..."I hope he builds that wall 100 feet high."

7. A lot of people think Trump is just an idiot or fool with a big mouth. They need to read Scott Adams series on the Master Persuader. Scott Adams has been consistently on target about Trump. Everything Trump does is calculated to redound to his favor.

8. Finally, in honor of Memorial Day weekend, I give you all the people who traveled to Iraq with me in 2005 for OIF III with the 155 BCT and did not return alive.



Saturday, May 21, 2016

Unpopular thoughts on a Saturday morning - 5/21/16



1. Our society has been too quick to attack bullying. It serves a useful societal function at times. Here, the parents are basically abusing a child and forcing the child into behavior that will prove harmful. Which is more harmful, the bullying meant to bring a child into conformance with nature or the parents who are psychologically harming and scarring the child for life?

2. Meanwhile, in New York City, businesses and landlords can be fined for not verbally stating a lie. Thius is the kind of insanity that eventually blows up in your face. In Canada, they plan on banning you if you think the truth.

3. Glenn Beck showed some strange behavior this election cycle. He basically claimed Ted Cruz was a fulfillment of a Mormon prophecy and that you weren't a real Christian if you didn't vote Cruz (yeah this from a Mormon). Now, he is fawning over Mark Zuckerberg. With the Blaze failing, is he trying to find a source of money? Is he just crazy? or is it a mix of both?

4. Everyone is shipping the people they don't want here. Trump can't be inaugurated quick enough.

5. Yeah, your chance of being raped or killed goes up significantly if you take in Muslim migrants. You are just now thinking that maybe people lie to surveys? The only people that want these migrants in society are the elite who live in sheltered and walled communites. They can afford to be "compassionate". The girl who gets gang raped in Cologne, not so much.

6. “It’s like me going into a girls’ bathroom wearing a wig,” Tanner Bischofberger, 15, a classmate of A J Jackson’s, who was not one of those in the bathroom, said this week. “It’s just weird.”. This non-stop insanity is getting to be a bit too much for everyone.

7. Liz Heron asks in this tweet (my commentary added at bottom):
No blacks? All Macs? I dunno, I give up.
8. Huffington Post: Jesus Was First Transgender Man. Like I said, non-stop insanity. Can we #BTFSTTG now?